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Nobu Dai Gin Jyo Sake YK35 1.8L
EFW review : 
This rounds off a year of adding sake to our staples. A limited production sake that we only receive in small amounts a few times a year, and one where the majority goes to the famous Nobu restaurant. This sake contineus to move quicker than our allocations can come, and here is the lastest small batch in stock. Super elegant and refined, and one that has impressed a lot of clients with much more sophisticated and well-versed sake palates than ours. This bottle just keeps getting better a couple weeks time. One last round to finish off the year!
Here is a little info on what YK 35 means... "Aromatic Ginjo-shu (premium sake) became trendy about 15 years ago, which helped stave off the decline in sake demand. This trend set the stage for the breweries to use “YK35” as their mantra in creating refined dry sakes. The “Y” in “YK35” stands for Yamada-nishiki, which is one of the top grades of Japanese rice grown specifically for making sake. “K” represents the type of yeast (kyokai 9-go) used in the brewing process. And “35” means that the rice polishing rate is 35%: 65% of the surface is polished away, leaving only the 35% of the grain intact. The popularity of high quality Ginjo-shu is still supporting the local sake breweries."

Nobu Dai Gin Jyo Sake YK35 1.8L

Nobu Dai Gin Jyo Sake YK35 1.8L

$169.99
$169.99

EFW review : 
This rounds off a year of adding sake to our staples. A limited production sake that we only receive in small amounts a few times a year, and one where the majority goes to the famous Nobu restaurant. This sake contineus to move quicker than our allocations can come, and here is the lastest small batch in stock. Super elegant and refined, and one that has impressed a lot of clients with much more sophisticated and well-versed sake palates than ours. This bottle just keeps getting better a couple weeks time. One last round to finish off the year!
Here is a little info on what YK 35 means... "Aromatic Ginjo-shu (premium sake) became trendy about 15 years ago, which helped stave off the decline in sake demand. This trend set the stage for the breweries to use “YK35” as their mantra in creating refined dry sakes. The “Y” in “YK35” stands for Yamada-nishiki, which is one of the top grades of Japanese rice grown specifically for making sake. “K” represents the type of yeast (kyokai 9-go) used in the brewing process. And “35” means that the rice polishing rate is 35%: 65% of the surface is polished away, leaving only the 35% of the grain intact. The popularity of high quality Ginjo-shu is still supporting the local sake breweries."